Home|Conferences & Workshops|Ontario Workplace Safety and Insurance Conference - Toronto


Ontario Workplace Safety and Insurance Conference

Toronto • October 4 - 12, 2021
Virtual Events: Lunch And Learn


Register Now

In association with: https://www.cirhr.utoronto.ca/https://www.iwh.on.ca/
 

Monday, October 4, 2021


Introductory remarks by Co-Chairs 12:00 PM - 12:05 PM  


Panel 1


Current Issues in Workers' Compensation: Major cases, significant policies, and other legal developments

12:05 PM - 1:15 PM

Sean Ryan
Vice-Chair
Workplace Safety and Insurance Appeals Tribunal
John Bartolomeo
Lawyer/Co-Director
Workers' Health & Safety Legal Clinic
Cassandra Ma
Legal Counsel
Canada Post Corporation
Alanna Mihalj
Legal Counsel
Amalgamated Transit Union Local 113
Carissa Tanzola
Employer Counsel
Filion Wakely Thorup Angeletti LLP

Panel Summary

In this panel, legal experts will discuss the most significant developments in workers' compensation law over the past year. Topics to be addressed include the implications of the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board's operational review report, and significant decisions on chronic mental stress, onus of proof, and the scope of the Workplace Safety and Insurance Appeals Tribunal's jurisdiction. Final selection of topics will take place in the weeks leading up to the conference to ensure coverage of the latest developments.

End of day one

1:15 PM

Tuesday, October 12, 2021


Introductory remarks by Co-Chairs 12:00 PM - 12:05 PM  


Panel 2


Making the Remote Accessible: Presenting medical evidence, preparing witnesses for virtual hearings, and more

12:05 PM - 1:15 PM

Julia Noble
Associate Counsel to Chair
Workplace Safety and Insurance Appeals Tribunal
Cézanne Charlebois
Employer Counsel
Charlebois Associates
Michelle Zare
Paralegal
Zare Paralegal Services

Panel Summary

Increased reliance on virtual hearings poses unique challenges in the workers' compensation context. Financial struggles faced by injured workers mean that they often lack adequate audiovisual equipment and/or reliable, high-speed Internet connections. Communication difficulties arising from disability and/or language barriers may be aggravated. Obtaining and presenting detailed medical evidence may also be more difficult in a virtual environment. In this session, workers' compensation experts will address these and other issues, including the following:

  • How have parties adapted to remote hearings? What, in your experience, are the advantages and disadvantages?
  • Will the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board and the Workplace Safety and Insurance Appeals Tribunal continue to hold a significant number of hearings virtually even after the pandemic ends? Should they?
  • How common is it for parties to lack adequate audiovisual equipment and/or a reliable Internet connection? What are the best practices for addressing this issue?
  • What are the barriers to participation for workers and employers with disabilities? What are the best practices for reducing or eliminating these barriers?
  • Do virtual hearings make it more difficult to ensure that workers and employers feel that they have been heard and that justice has been done? If so, how can this defect be remedied? How can parties and adjudicators ensure that a virtual hearing is not dehumanizing for the worker?
  • Are there significant differences between testifying at a remote hearing versus an in-person hearing? How should representatives prepare their clients to testify at a remote hearing?
  • How is using a language interpreter different in a remote hearing versus an in-person hearing? What are the best practices?
  • What are the challenges of gathering medical evidence during the COVID-19 pandemic? What is the best way to present medical evidence at a remote hearing? How does this differ from an in-person hearing?

Conference Ends

1:15 PM

Keynote Speakers


CPD


Click here to find out more information regarding CPD and the hour requirements in your province.

Conference Session

  • Members of the Law Society of Ontario may consider counting this program for 2.5 Substantive Hours; 0 Professionalism Hours.
  • This program contains 0.25 CEUs and may be eligible for Board of Canadian Registered Safety Professionals Continuing Professional Development Points. See www.bcrsp.ca for criteria.


HRPA Continuing Professional Development

This program has been approved for 2.5 Continuing Professional Development hours under Section A3 of the Recertification Log of the Human Resources Professionals Association.